The Hat Makes the Man (after Max Ernst), 2004

overview

Data

The Hat Makes the Man (after Max Ernst)
2004
2090 x 3654 x 3000 mm | 82.3 x 143.9 x 118.1 in | Edition 1 of 3
Painted bronze and steel
Image: Photographed by Gareth Winters © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS 2017

Exhibitions

Group Exhibition - 2004
Tate Britain, London, United Kingdom

Context

Taking inspiration from Max Ernst’s collage ‘The Hat Makes the Man’ (1920) Hirst originally constructed the elements of this sculpture from fragments of wooden doors and felt hats. He then had the entire thing cast in bronze at Pangolin Foundry. In a similar manner to ‘Hymn’ (1999 - 2005) and ‘Charity’ (2002 - 03), the work retains the appearance of the original materials; the painting process is hidden.

Ernst’s collage consisted of clippings of men’s hats taken from sales catalogues glued onto sketches of coloured towers. The work was a visual pun relating to Sigmund Freud’s identification of the hat with the repressed bourgeois man. Hirst’s large-scale rendering of the collage was first exhibited as part of the three-person show ‘In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida’, at Tate Britain in 2004.